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that it would be difficult to ratify an u.n. treaty that is based on existing u.s. law. but then again you might not have met the modern republican party where ideological zealots rule. on july 26 1990, president george bush sr. signed the americans with disabilities act. the bill passed the house and the senate with only 34 legislate34legislators total opposing it. yet today 38 republican senators voted no on the u.n. treaty that would extend the ada to the rest of the world. inclusion six who had voted yay on the bill in 19 ott. this was sufficient to block it. the treaty was adopted by the united nations six years ago and has since been ratified by 126 countries, just not the united states. even a last-minute appeal by former senator bob dole himself a disabled veteran, as well as every major veterans group and even the chamber of commerce could not sway senate republicans. but this is what has become of the republican party. a party whose views often dissend to the lowest common denominator and defined by paranoid fears of the u.n. that are devoid of any fact whatsoever. so one could underst
that could supersede current u.s. laws in some ways and impose mandatory limits on carbon emissions. president obama failed to get a cap-and-trade will pass in his first term. is he quietly planning a new carbon crackdown through other means? joining me now is lou dobbs, host of "lou dobbs tonight" on the fox business network. that was one agenda item he could not get through. cap and trade. even when the democrats controlled the house as well, they just couldn't get that through. what would he be doing through the united nations and he could do through the u.s. congress? lou: the efforts that he is undertaking here, so little is known about what we are discussing in qatar, at the meeting of the united nations we are talking about laying out a mission schedule through 2035. without any public discussion, there is nothing about it than a presidential debate, as you know. this could have a mammoth effect on this economy. we are talking about tax levels and also significant pressure on the gdp of this country, the growth rate. and some are saying, it would be a negative to drive the ec
. and the hospital has pointed out that they probably broke the law, at least that's the advice the hospital's received. this is a few other things the chief executive said. >> technically i think this was a breach of patient confidentiality, which i regret. having said that, the information which was inadvertently revealed is already in the public domain. i think this whole thing is pretty deplorable. our nurses are caring, professional people not to cope with journalistic trickery of this sort. >> max foster reporting for us. you get the point what's going on. pranksters in australia, potentially could be in some trouble despite their apology. we'll continue to watch the story. we, of course, wish the duchess of cambridge only the best. >>> meanwhile, important new research that could impact people that take aspirin to reduce the risk of hard attacks and strokes. a common coating used on aspirin, stand by we'll give you details. for pain, it's just for sleep. because sleep is a beautiful thing. ♪ zzzquil, the non-habit forming sleep-aid from the makers of nyquil. well, having a ton of lo
-- >> let me finish. you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court as the law of the lan. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter id l affectproportionately minorities, -- to me if white americans can get id's to vote and to the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? they are lesser then? that is what bothers me about the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. that we always have to make special -- to ask to be a specialist -- specialness but we deal with minorities because they are two people minded. we have to make concessions for them because they cannot follow the rules like everybody else. when you treat people like victims, i do not think they want to inspire. >> more with the editor and publisher of conservative black chick.com, sunday night at 8:00 on q&a. next, house budget committee ranking democrat chris van hollen, a tennessee republican bob corker and other members of congress talking about this fiscal cliff. hosted by bloomberg government and the lloyd. this is about an hour. -- and del
hours, longer ballots, and tougher voter i.d. laws. these voters refused to be intimidated. those same republicans cannot be trusted to fix the problem they created. let's turn tonight to california senator, barbara boxer. senator, great to have you with us tonight. i appreciate your time. when do you do election reform? well, i think when there's not an election going on and people are paying attention. i want to thank you for doing this. this has been a story that we have spent countless hours on, leading up to the election. but how do you see the federal government setting standards? what does the l.i.n.e. act do for states like ohio and florida, where there have been problems? >> well, first, thank you for all the work you've done on this. i'll tell you, my heart sank when i saw those lines, because i thought back to the '04 election in ohio. and i don't know if you know this, but i actually stalled the electoral college vote, because i was so incensed when i learned that in minority precincts in ohio, people waited for 12 hours to vote and many gave up. it was pouring down rain. t
are the laws going to be, what are the tax lie bills going to be, and this congress owes it to the american people to tell them. >>eric: congressman, america has always been about hard working people earning, creating jobs, creating opportunity, passing a better life on to the next generation, to their kids, i don't know, at some point maybe you say it is time to man up, go over the fiscal cliff, and see what happens, fix the debt problem and maybe things will be better, maybe 10 or 15 years down the road, but maybe that is the responsible thing to do. >>guest: i was with you until you said the responsible thing to do. when the congress created this sequestration nightmare it wasn't the responsible thing to do. they did it so we would do the responsible thing and that the sequestration, the fiscal cliff the responsible thin wouldn't happen but if we don't get from the american people, if they don't call their congress person, whether they are republican or democrat and tell us to move off the dime and get the job done, we call --. >>eric: what happens in what happens? i tell you what happen
healthcare. >>> i know some people want me to bypass congress and change the laws on my own. believe me -- [ applause ] and believe me, right now dealing with congress, the id idea -- >> that was a tough one. that was the president getting heckled last year. this summer those dreamers had their demands met, at least in part with the deferred action for childhood arrivals ordered by president obama. so far, 310,000 young people have applied. that action may in fact have bore fruit for the president on election night when he took home 71% of the latino vote. yet, no comprehensive reform had been attempted by the obama add mrpgs. many are still looking to the president for leadership on the issue. back with my panel. i'm interested in this because this is a moment on the one hand they're heckling, but the next moment they do basically what i have to read from a page in the republican handbook, they hand to him a policy. they're like here, do this. and sure enough, he does it. we end up with deferred action. >> right. >> is that the model for how we're going to get immigration reform done s
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
initiatives decriminalized the recreational use of pot. but it is still illegal under federal law. options for the administration include preventing the states from regulating and taxing marijuana or cutting off federal cash. a new jersey town acting like the grinch trying to tear down one man's christmas spirit. the fight is over this 400-foot inflatable santa. the owner of seasonal world says there is no ordinance but he has been issued five tickets ordering him to take it down. the mayor calling it a hazard because it could blow over. >> what i do every year and i have been doing it for 12 years and they have been basically harassing me for 12 years. >> the owner of seasonal world says he has no intention of moving santa and he will take the battle to court after christmas. a fireworks display in burma goes terribly wrong when explosions go off into the crowd. [screams] >> you can hear the screams. this is a festival and hot air balloons were filled were fireworks. they were sent into the air. one balloon started exploding too soon and the fires shot into the crowd. people ran for their
-run health insurance exchange to implement, as you know, a key part of the president's federal law. how is that likely to go over with the nearly i think it's 20% of residents in her state that have no health insurance? >> well, it shouldn't go over well, and we'll see whether that 20% rises up and says, look, this is the law. you have to follow the law. also i wonder if there's anything, anything that the federal government can do to get miss brewer -- governor brewer to do right by the citizens of her state. >> governor brewer hosted the western governors association winter meeting this weekend, yet when she delivered her keynote speech on the subject of energy, only two of her fellow governors showed up. maybe they'd heard her answer a report aers question about climate change. >> everybody has an opinion on it, you know, and, you know, i probably don't believe that it's manmade. i believe that, you know, that weather and certain elements are controlled maybe by different things. >> controlled by different things. do you think she spent too much time in the sunshine? >> different thi
's tied up in sequestration, and the way the -- as i understand it anyway -- the way the law requires the cuts to be taken, it really is, it really is an axe right at the middle which will be very difficult to do in any kind of smooth way. so i'm confident that, you know, with a little longer-term view the pentagon can be fine. and one of the things that the group agrees on is that both with that time and where we are in terms of our overall requirements in a changing world, the advancement of technology, the quality of the people we have -- and they're the best i've seen in over 43 years of having the privilege to wear the uniform -- that we will be fine from a defense standpoint. but i also would pick up on what senator nunn said, quoting bill perry. and i've seen this in countries and in regions globally where the failure to be able to invest in preventive defense, engagement, having a relationship, helping other militaries train in their own countries, the not being able to do that just increases the likelihood of some kind of conflict breaking out which may or may not involve us.
, a frank discussion about gun laws and gun violence is a discussion we need to have. thank you for speaking up. one point that he did make, which i thought was very resonating with me during that interview with dan patrick, he said tony dungey when he was head coach of the indianapolis coach, during a training campmeeting, he asked hissers, how many of you in this room own a gun. 65 hands went up. that's when he said the discussion needs to begin. why do 65 nfl football players own guns. >> well, they would say for protection. >> but why? >> these are the kind of things that need to be discussed in country. there's nothing wrong with discussing gun control. hopefully cnn and other organizations will do just that. joe carter, thank you very much. >>> scott kelly is aiming to set an american record. he's expected to talk soon but first let's hear from john zarrella who is joining us live. hey, john. >> reporter: hi, carol. you're looking at the joint press conference that nasa was carrying out in houston and moscow because it will, as you mentioned, be american scott kelly and the russian mik
into a dictator who is ramming through a constitution that while it does not specify sharia law as the ruling factor nonetheless has various clauses that take the country toward sharia law over the coming years. i think they are embarrassed. we can't change egypt. but we give them well over $1 billion in aid a year and we can play on the margins. bill: many people think egypt is the next iran if morsi continues on the path he's on. do we cut off aid in this case? >> the bod i language, the tone suggests the white house is willing to go along with morsi. the reason morsi and the muslim brotherhood are pushing this through so swiftly is because the egyptian economy is tanking. tourism has almost zeroed out. when was the last time you bought a product manufactured in egypt. beyond the religion except for the real he can realists, what the poor of egypt want is a job. they want economic improvements and morsi knows he can't deliver on a reasonable time frame so he's ramming through this constitution hell for leather because he can do it now and wouldn't be able to do it later. bill: i was surpris
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for ratification of a united nations treaty on the rights of the disabled, which was modeled on a law passed by the senate. 22 years ago, the americans with disabilities act. in effect, it was a vote to export american law to the 155 nations around the world that have signed this treaty. a treaty that has already been ratified by 126 of those countries, including the united kingdom, france, germany, china, russia has ratified it. now you can pass anything in the senate with 60 votes. except treaties which require 66. a two-thirds majority. every democrat voted for the treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. 38 republicans disgraced themselves and disgraced the senate. by voting against it and controlling the outcome. john kerry tried everything he could on the senate floor to show republicans the way to vote for this treaty. >> it really isn't controversial. what this treaty says is very simple. it just says that you can't discriminate against the disabled. it says that other countries have to do what we did 22 years ago when we set the example for the world and passed the am
, then argue the law. if the law is against you, then argue the facts. if both are against you, just make it up. well, that's exactly what's happening. because to join is to keep faith with the men and women who have suffered disability in defense of our nation and we owe them nothing less. this treaty is not about changing america. it's about america changing the world. this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. >> these are the facts. the treaty ensures equal opportunity for disabled adults and kids around the world. it's supported by every major veterans and disability group in america. 152 countries have already ratified the treaty including china and russia. the treaty is modelled after existing u.s. law. former senator bob dole is 89 years old. he just got out of the hospital yesterday. and today he came to the senate floor in a wheelchair to support the treaty. eight republicans and two independents voted for the treaty including john mccain. but it wasn't enough. the treaty failed 61-3
in that law and we ought to be content to let some of those actually play themselves out before we start messing around with something that's so important to 50 million americans. >> i believe you've pointed out in the past the cuts that were made with medicare are the same cuts that the president was attacked for during the election. >> exactly. these are savings, about a third of which were reducing the subsidy for insurance companies providing medicare advantage programs and the rest of them pretty much cut to providers and we didn't reduce services. we expanded some while leaving money over the long term and the cbo said the affordable care act will save $1.2 trillion. again, we need to be careful what we do with the medicare portion of the social safety net because we've actually made some significant changes that have yet to play out. >> all right. thank you very much, sir. we greatly appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. >> now, ab stoddard, erin mcpike and keith boykin. a.b. let's start with you. let's read what senator demint and senator paul had to say about the proposal of boe
hand. he's the sole negotiate, whatever he gets from president obama will be the rule of law. and i think what's really emboldened boehner, ironically, mitt romney's loss. it's this idea that john boehner's survived, he's the one who came through. we were able to keep the house. he does get a lot of credit for that among house republican circles, they were able to keep the house. people think -- >> he raised something like 100 million dollars. >> he's the kingmaker. i suspect that, from folks that i've talked to, eric cantor will not be a thorn in boehner's side. eric cantor realizes he has time, niece his 40s, he wants to be the first jewish speaker of the house. sit back, relax, you know what? if boehner becomes unpopular you don't have to lead a charge against him. you can say, well, that's too bad, john, you don't have the support. but he doesn't have to do anything, he can sit back. >> on positive way, it's not mitt romney's loss as obama's win which has helped him. they're bedfellows now. they've have to negotiate from a different perspective. >> what's shocked me there's this
in egypt. but it just seems to me that morsi is turning out to be a radical. he wants sharia law to replace the secular state. he is not in favor of personal freedoms. he is not going to have a constitution that favors the kind of freedoms we thought they were going to go for. morsi's going to be a bad guy, is he not, marc? we'll have to contend with somebody -- >> larry, are you surprised? are you shocked? should anyone be shocked that the muslim brotherhood is after almost 60 years of waiting in the wings trying to finally seize power, trying to use the leverage of power, has bought off the army by candy-coating constitutional provisions to create a military state within a state? i'm not surprised at all. >> if he loses the referendum -- he's got a referendum. he says he's going to allow the referendum on december 15th. if he loses that referendum which ain't all that great for the constitution, but if he loses it, do you think he'll overturn it and just hold on to power as a dictator? >> i don't think in the end he's going to lose it because in the end, the muslim brotherhood has the gro
the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> governor malloy. >> this is the problem, right? there are no rules in washington. when there are rules, they get changed to any argument you like. you can hire an economist to say what you like. >> they are the worst. >> all you are doing is arguing over the 20% in the middle. >> this is an amazing vision of politi politics. one politician, one economist, it's true. it's absolutely true. any argument, you can get a politician, economist and 40 people. >>> as long as you have a party label. >> exactly. >> then it enters, once you get to 40 and 40, it enters a round where it's debated as if reality is debated. it's not what has been debated in this country for a long time. there are no hard and fast rules that apply. it is the political argument that w
more liberal editions say it is sharia law that fail to protect the rights of minorities and women. >>> the duchess of cambridge is said to be feeling better this morning after treatment for cute morning sickness. prince william's wife is expected to stay in king edwards hospital for several days. >> reporter: good morning charlie. the news today seems to be better. after spending a second day at the hospital with his wife, prince william left her looking a lot more relaxed. kate is, quote, continuing to feel better and it seems that the prince was feeling a little better, too. kate is generally an active woman, a bit of a jock at school as she showed in her last public appearance before the onset of the illness. doctors say there's no reason she shouldn't continue to respond to treatment. while she's been a natural at the meet and greet part of the job, the most important part of her job has always been to provide heirs to the throne. that will get priority now. given the delicate start to her delicate condition, we're bound to see less of her over the next few months. >> i think
said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people voter i.d. loss disproportionately affect minorities -- implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. as -- if white americans can get id to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. we always have to make -- there has to be a special mass when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble minded. we really need to make concessions for them because they cannot follow the rules like everybody else. when you treat people like victims, i do not think they want to ask bair. wright, ith crystal righ sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> they both -- politicians from both sides said they would be able to avoid the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloo
of the appropriations and budget committee. also joined by georgetown university tax law professor john buckley on how the alternative minimum tax is affecting fiscal negotiations. "washington journal" is next. ♪ ♪ host: 25 days to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do n
, dividends. current laws, they go back up. dividends treated as ordinary income. capital gains goes back up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about? if those become bargaining chips, how much are we giving up? >> under current law, the capital gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. we are actually talking 23.8%. dividends are scheduled to go to ordinary rates. you need the 3.8% for people who have higher incomes. significant increases in both are scheduled. as you think about the fiscal cliff and what is coming, one of the few places you can see people responding to it is in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up to how, shareholders take a vintage of a lower rate. i expect you will see more investors realize lower capital gains in order to get lower rates. there is clearly money there. there is clearly money that has interesting, distributional characteristics. as you think about the political process trying to structure when a package with a revenue goal and a distribution goal, my prediction is you will see at least some of those increases occur.
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-out of it. >> guaranteed up front measurable savings scored by sea enacted into law. the only guarantee is when congress enacts policies. >> you would be willing to go for specific things and guarantee that there would be a specific amount of cuts? >> of course, of course. >> but that's next year? >> no, that's not true. we're prepared to do up front alongside a deal that includes raising rates. we are prepared to do a meaningful amount of savings on the spending side. not just to avoid the damage of the sequester, but to help reduce the long-term deficits. >> you want them -- you want them to come forward for the cuts. >> in general we've laid out a detailed plan. we would be happy to look at an alternative plan, but they have to lay that out for us. both on the revenue and rates side. also on the spending side. that's just a reasonable way. we can't sit here and try to figure out what works for them. they have to tell us what works for them. let's go to what's at stake in this context. this is something we can do. i think we're going to get there. there's too much at stake not to get
. but at the same time, richard, boehner seems to be laying down the law with this house republican caucus. he stripped four house members of committee seats, presumably because they bucked the party on key votes. three of those congressional members were elected during the tea party victory in 2010. >> yeah, look, reverend, it's not his legacy on the line here. it's his job on the line here. one of the problems he's had all the way through is he's had eric cantor hyped hbehind him poised challenge him for the leadership. he has to play a difficult game here where he has to assert his leadership, not expose himself too much to that challenge. that makes actually negotiating with him extremely difficult. republicans have to decide who they are, what they stand for, other than opposing everything that the president does, other than supporting every single tax cut that anyone could ever support. that's easy, right? now that they've lost, they have to decide who they are. and in the house they have to decide which leader they want. is this john boehner's caucus? is it eric cantor's caucus? negotia
based on what has been american law since the first bush presidency 22 years ago. the treaty supported by every democrat and eight republicans, came five votes short of passage of the required 66 needed for ratification. 38 republicans voted no despite the return to the floor of former majority leader bob dole only days out of the hospital. there at the age of 89 to rally support from his former friends including orrin hatch, cluck grassley, mitch mcconnell and thad cochran but they voted it down. the floor manager john kerry called it one of the saddest days in his nearly 28 days in the senate which he says is broken and dysfunctional. the chairman of the foreign relations committee john kerry joins me now. thank you very much. you spoke of this passionately yesterday and you've had an overnight to think about this, but the moment was clearly so compelling watching bob dole on the floor, wheeled in by his wife, the former senator elizabeth dole and you and john mccain and other war veterans calling for passage of this, it tell me your thoughts today? >> my first thought, andrea, hate
. >> jennifer: right. so what would it take to double the minimum wage? you've got federal law and state laws. you would have to either go state by state or get an increase on the federal level is that what you're shooting for? the federal? >> what we're shooting for is to have the fast food industry come to the table. this is an industry, like you said, makes billions of dollars in profits and has made billions. record profits after the recession. they're recovering. the workers are not. they can afford to pay workers $15 an hour. the question is will they do it? >> jennifer: so have they come to the table? have you been able to have a conversation with them? >> i haven't heard from mcdonald's. i haven't heard from burger king or yum! brands. i don't think linda has either. so no. >> jennifer: linda, what was the mood on the picket line? how did customers respond when they saw the signs? >> they were pretty happy. they were for us. they told us keep fighting. >> jennifer: and so do you think, jonathan, will you t
because it would allow american government to impose new laws on disabled home school children. there is no wording that hints that either one of those things could be true. for some of the senators the real reasoning was because they believe the treaty is part of a vast conspiracy. >> vast conspiracy to tell us that the world is round. everybody knows that ain't so. we could fall right off. >> stephanie: bob dole came to show his support for the treaty. john mccain even voted for it. there they are. >> blue helmets and black helicopters everywhere you look. >> stephanie: you know what? what a perfect day to have spongebob squarepants on the show with a message for republicans. ♪ spongebob here ♪ ♪ kris means presents and mistletoe ♪ ♪ sharing and caring ♪ ♪ during this season, please, don't be a jerk ♪ ♪ bring joy to the world it's the thing to do ♪ ♪ the world does not revolve around you ♪ ♪ don't be a jerk ♪ ♪ it's christmas ♪ ♪ there's a sign above the line that says expr
communities apart. this was so obvious to everyone that when we reform welfare in the 1990's, a law was passed by a republican congress and signed by a democratic president. what happened? welfare enrollment dropped dramatically. millions of people gained new lives of independence. poverty rates for children fell over 20% in four years. more single moms found jobs. your welfare checks going out and more money for states to spend on child care so more moms could go to work and support themselves. welfare reform worked because it encouraged the best in people. it appealed to their desire to shape their own destiny. it helped get government out of the business of fostering dependency. here is the problem. we have not applied a welfare reform mindset with equal vigor across programs. in most cases, we are still trying to measure compassion by how much spend cannot how many we help. last year, spending on programs came over $1 trillion. what does that mean in practical terms? for that amount of money, you could give every single poor american a check for $22,000. instead, we just spent all of that
. it is the only reason i was able federal grants and loans. when i graduate from law school, i had close to $150,000 in student debt. that is a debt i paid off last year. i was able to help pay it off amazon. [applause] >> pell grant system -- let's make sure parents and students understand how long it will take them to complete the education, the likelihood of completion, make after graduation, and how much their monthly loan will be. it now is the time to be creative and daring and class. beyond education, paul touched on this and i want to reemphasize, but beyond education, there's another obstacle that is keeping too many young americans from moving ahead. many of them do not have the middle-class job. it is because they grew up in an unstable home environment. they grew up in dangerous neighborhoods with no access to healthcare. single parents and sometimes an elderly grandmother. they may not have a chance to participate in afterschool are working and cannot pick them up. every day some amazing parent or caretaker is of her, and all of it to give these kids a chance at a better life. consi
they say that with a straight face? meantime, over in wisconsin, a voter i.d. law was rejected by the courts but today the incoming assembly speaker was asked if it would be worth changing the constitution. he replied, quote, yes, i would favor that. over in north carolina the president of a conservative group ask preand that governor pat mccrory will sign, will establish a photo i.d. law like last year. like i said on election night, the fight goes on. they will keep coming but we'll be ready. we've come too far to stop fighting for our voting rights now. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. >>> you may not know frank luntz's name but you definitely know his work. he was the pollster behind newt gingrich's lie of the year in 2010 and as a fox contributor, he's a fox news regular. >> pollster frank lentz, thank you for joini
. because the law changed remember in england you can be king or queen. it is not just king first. it is either one of them . so which ever twin comes out first is the heir. we now know why they fight. >> brian: absolutely. >> gretchen: there is a heck of a lot of the fighting if you are in the royal family. >> brian: how long does the royal pregnancy last. >> steve: nine monthses. we only have three. >> gretchen: you know the date. >> steve: i think they said yesterday they ar expecting a june baby and she's about 12 months long. >> gretchen: he and i share the same birthday. >> brian: i share a birthday with johnnie unitus . julie andrews and mary poppins. >> gretchen: ♪ the hills are alive. >> brian: carrie underwood . we have headlines for you. >> steve: brand new details about the desperate search for a 11 year old leukemia patient whose mother slipped her out of the phoenix hospital. listen to the 911 call after the nurse spotted them leaving. >> they were by the front entrance and walked into the bathroom. disconnected her from the iv and walked out of the front door and
on american law. this treaty isn't about american behavior except to the degree that it influences other countries to be more like us. this treaty is about the behavior of other countries and their willingness to raise their treatment of people with disabilities to our level. it's that simple. this treaty isn't about changing america. it's a treaty to change the world to be more like america. so why join? i've heard my colleagues ask several times. why, if it doesn't have recourse in the law, why join? i'll tell you why, mr. preside mr. president. because we can sit at the table and affect the lives of our citizens by pushing other countries upwards. because we gain credibility and accelerate change through our advocacy by being part of a process. because it's good for american business, which can sell products and services as other nations raise their standards and need our expertise to meet their goals, which is why, incidentally, the united states chamber of commerce supports this treaty and a huge number of businesses. why support it? because george h.w. bush started this process and
to the anti-bribery law. why does bribery have to be illegal? [ laughter ] >> wow. >> stephanie: oh that is just -- >> i'll give you a hundred if you make this law go away. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: who could be so uptight about bribery. that's delightful. >> did i say a hundred? thousand. okay. a million. 10 million. >> stephanie: all right. 17 million -- 17 million -- see i'm talking and sheldon and 17 million just rolled off of my tongue. >> you probably have over a thousand dollars worth of music. >> stephanie: right? and what happens if you have a power outrage or a virus or chardonnay incident. >> or your computer turns into a bag of glass. >> stephanie: right. carbonite, do it. it will take care of backing up everything for you. set it up once it is so easy and all of your files are backed up automatically and continually. you don't have to think -- forget about it. for $59 for the entire year -- >> that's cheaper than a bag of vipers. >> stephanie: right? right! access your backed up files from my computer or smartphone. that's a cool added thing. when you
that option open. so while it's technically not illegal under international law for him to have this capability these are very, very dangerous products. gregg: speaking of illegal, people who commit crimes against humanity, war crimes are held in the dock at the international criminal court in the hague. there is talk now that bashar al-assad may try to seek asylum. should the u.s. position be no, you must be held to account for what you've done, or let's just get him out of here? >> well, i don't think the international criminal court is a legitimate organization under any circumstances, but in this case i think it posts the hard question whether this determination to prosecute somebody doesn't cause more death and destruction than giving somebody like bashar al-assad immunity, getting them out of the country and trying to end this conflict. the problem is it's hard to see who can give him that real grant, maybe the russians and that's why there is reporting that they are talking to bashar al-assad. but one reason i think he and other dictators tend to stay to the end is they d
it of the huge expenses of the obama health care law which is facing them as well, so i'm always optimistic, you great concerns about the direction of the economy under this president. >> i don't know how you could be opoptimistic if everybody is making vacation plans and all i hear is you're at a stale mate and the goal posts are being moved and nobody is talking in the same room. i just frac fragilely frankly t. >> the election was four weeks ago from tonight. it's four weeks from now in the future that we're over the cliff, and i see no movement by the president. the offer that tim geithner brought was an awful one. he just wants a new credit card without a limit. the senate hasn't passed a bucket in almost four years. >> if we hit the debt ceiling at the end of the month, it will go into effect about february because there's some money games we can do to pay our debt until then, to manage to get by. in february when we're totally out of money and all the americans who filed for their tax returns wanting their money, they want their refund and we don't have any cash, we'll see how happy the a
appreciate you taking the time. explain this to me, if you would. what is this law change? >> essentially all it means is that it no longer makes a difference if you're a male or a female and you're in the line of succession to the thrown. both male and female will be treated equally as of october 2011. >> so it's retroactive. so if they can't get it fully passed, it's still okay. how far are we from actually seeing this law go through? is there any doubt? >> it was first announced in october of 2011. it went into effect immediately. it's going to be put into legislation. it will be a little while before we see it in writing but it was made effective as of october 2011. >> and so prince william was seen going to visit katherine at the hospital again today. how do we know how she's doing? given the situation, they were forced to announce this much earlier than they normally would have. >> right. she is in hospital for the next few days, she is being treated and he is by her side. hopefully it went be long before we see them again. >> and coming up, internet security pioneer john mcafee wanted
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